Antonio Pagano on April 12, 2014

Experts are made not born

As technology geeks we feel that we are born with unique super powers that allow us to achieve complex tasks such as writing code and building complex applications - wow!

On the other hand we know (through experience) that to become an expert at something takes time, so why do we still think that we’re born to inherit that unique DNA that makes us experts in all things software development related?

As a startup we are used to switching hats between tasks expeditiously, we’re not a company and culture where you do that one thing you are destined to do, at Wawandco our people grow organically and are capable of diving into most of the work we’re involved in for our clients, in a sense - we’re multi-functional individuals.

In this fast hat-switching world where us startups live, due to the size of our teams, we’ve created a line of differentiation between admin tasks and software development tasks and people who fulfill these tasks, something interesting happened this week.

This week we’ve been at full-capacity on our dev team (yes, I was busy developing too ), and some of our old gold clients needed us to do some html/css tasks, I’m talking about that kind of clients you cannot say NO because its not just another client but a partner (thats common here). We talked with our client and explained the situation, we told them that there was someone on our team that could do that job; to be candid this person had done some light HTML/CSS training in the past but never production ready work, our client agreed to test her and in just a day they got back to me informing me that they wanted her to work full-time on their project.

That absolutely caught my attention, and proved to me that we’re going in the right direction - by showing our teams they can continue to learn and more crucially learn about things that are different from their day-to-day tasks; we completed the task that was assigned to us by our gold partner, and we continue fostering great relations with them, other than that I think we’ve learned something that is not to underestimate the people in our teams, after all we’ve done a great job hiring great people who are smart and want to grow.

Our engineering teams in the company are happy and have learned a lesson about becoming experts - the lesson is that everyone with training and the proper dedication can become expert, is just about striving for perfection every step of the way!


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